JAN
16
2004

Strong KDE Presence at LinuxWorld NYC

The preparations for the KDE presence at the upcoming LinuxWorld NYC are now complete. It should be a blast! We have ten KDE volunteers staffing the booth, some great demo hardware (generously provided by SUSE), a seven-foot banner, Kolab Server/KDE Groupware demos on a 21" LCD (provided by Ian Reinhart Geiser), and a laptop we will give away to one lucky booth visitor. It is also worth a mention that KDE has been named finalist in two categories of the LinuxWorld Product Excellence Awards: Best Open Source Project and Best Development Tool (KDevelop).

The North American PR momentum continues to grow!

On the technical side, in addition to the two SUSE machines running KDE 3.2, Ian Reinhart Geiser will have a minicube with Debian unstable and XFree 4.3 and have demos for:

All this in addition to general Q&A on KDE deployment and development in companies.

Sticking with the KJSEmbed theme, on Thursday George Staikos will present a talk on desktop scripting (KJSEmbed, DCOP, and other fun stuff) that is only available to people with conference passes.

In addition to the technical demos, we also have a bit of press relations set up. George will be doing a 15 minute SysCon radio show on "What's New in 3.2" and Brian Proffitt (managing editor at Linux Today) will stop by on Wednesday to get an update on progress on the Conquering the Enterprise Desktop initiative.

A final note of thanks to Nathan Krause at NALeKRA. He approached the KDE e.V. with an offer of thanks for all the great work done on KDE, and as a token of his appreciation he donated a laptop to KDE that we will give away at the booth. Thanks Nathan!

If you are going to the show, be sure to stop by and say hello!

Comments

he trolls and scores!

sorry man, the EU is not immune to silly laws. in fact the up and coming EU dcma style laws and software patents will be just as bad, if not worse.

no where in the world is safe as long as corporations control the governments. just because you are anit-american doesnt make Europe any safer... it just makes you more ignorant to the world around you.

-ian reinhart geiser


By Ian Reinhart Geiser at Fri, 2004/01/16 - 6:00am

> no where in the world is safe as long as corporations control the governments. just because you are anit-american doesnt make Europe any safer... it just makes you more ignorant to the world around you.

Bravo! Well said. I often wonder how many people would be conflicted meeting me to realize that I am an American and love my home. Perhaps when you are very young you can image such a thing as a perfect place because you are unaware of reality. Then again it's easy to become aware of a few things, and perhaps the things that your centers of influence choose to expose you to, and develop a bias based on a fraction of the available facts.

Countries, like people, are flawed and have failures and problems, but with countries often diverse influences can make some very good and very bad things side by side. What we in FOSS believe is important is not just free as in beer but free as in speech. Look back in your history for where and when this originated. It was the late 1700s here. The US also contributed the microporcessor, the ISA architecture, Microsoft, DMCA and the FSF/GPL.

Clearly on both fronts, freedom and oppression, America is at the front lines of the battle and there is no reason to withdraw from the front lines. The idea it's bad to do something here suggests that Europeans should not attend and guys like Linus Torvolds and myself should either find something else to do or move. That's good for FOSS?

If you want to make positive change in the world then you move across borders to like minds and establish bonds. You build strength and organization where people live... and you never verbally attack their homeland or make arrogant statements. Growing power to make change cannot be done creating division.


By Eric Laffoon at Fri, 2004/01/16 - 6:00am

Just to correct some of your FUD...

sorry man, the EU is not immune to silly laws. in fact the up and coming EU dcma style laws and software patents will be just as bad, if not worse.

The current situation in the EU remains that software patents are not going to be implemented. The only thing that will change this is if Europeans who know about the issues stop pestering their MPs and MEPs, particularly when the new EU Parliament gets elected later this year.

But yes, there's no point in getting nationalistic (or should that be continentalistic?) about these things, except for when it makes sense to remain in one nation or legal entity because another is a bad place to be.


By Tom at Fri, 2004/01/16 - 6:00am


By Thorsten Schnebeck at Wed, 2004/01/21 - 6:00am

Pages